File 12-05-2016, 12 25 37

Tax Haven cartoon

File 12-05-2016, 12 25 37

This is a cartoon drawn yesterday in support of various development charities and their tax haven campaigns during the Anti-corruption summit.

It is also one of the first cartoons that I’ve drawn digitally. I’ll write more about this at some point, but in the meantime you can watch my work in progress…

I was pleased that this cartoon was shared by Oxfam International and Christian Aid, though it sounds as if there is a lot more work to be done on the corruption / tax havens front.

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
pcc-2

The PCC Member’s Essential Guide

It is the time of year when people are thinking about Parochial Church Councils, and could do with some help, perhaps in the form of a handy book.

I did a cover illustration for The PCC Member’s Essential Guide by Mark Tanner, and the image has been turned into an animation. See the video above. It isn’t often that I get animated, so enjoy it while you can.

If you’re a new Parochial Church Council member, or an old one who’d like a guide to your role, this book could well be for you. Available from Church House Publishing.

pcc-2

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
elephant-bike

The Elephant bike

elephant-bike-cartoon

This is a cartoon I have done for the Elephant Bike. In summary: Elephant Bikes are old Post Office bikes that are done up and sold by a charity in a new guise. They are refurbished by young offenders, and each one bought pays for another bike to be shipped to Malawi. The cartoon hopefully explains all of this.

I have my own Elephant Bike (picture below, taken before I’d adjusted saddle to correct height…). I’ve only ridden it to do a few minor errands so far, but the plan is that it will be my supermarket shopping bike as the box at the front carries quite a decent load.

It must be said, these bikes are incredibly good value and I’d thoroughly recommend them. For only £250 (£280 with carrier + basket or box) you get a extremely sturdy low-maintenance (hub gears, drum brakes) bike refurbished to a high standard, and you’re supporting a great cause too. Buy one while you can.

You can find out more via the following links:

Elephant Bike website / Buy a bike
Elephant Bike on Facebook
Twitter – @ElephantBike

elephant-bike

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
bicycles-more-than-one-706

The Cycling Cartoonist: A book of cycling cartoons

bicycles-more-than-one-706

I’ve got some exciting news. I have been commissioned to draw a book of cycling cartoons. The provisional title is ‘The Cycling Cartoonist’. The book will be published in June 2017 by Bloomsbury, who publish a good number of cycling books (as well as Harry Potter).

So, I will be spending much of the next six months drawing the cartoons for the book. It is a slightly daunting prospect as I will need to produce a lot of new work, but I know I have plenty of good material lined up in notebooks and on the back of cycling cafe napkins, so I’m really looking forward to getting stuck into it.

I have various minor cycling exploits planned in order to gather ideas, and there will hopefully be blog updates as I go. But I’m also hoping to talk to people who cycle to help me develop ideas for new cartoons. This could be you – if you live in London or Essex and meeting up is doable I’ll happily buy you a coffee or beer in return for your thoughts on cycling (let me know). But I’m sure there will be ways the online community can help as well – watch this space.

For followers of my church-themed work: Don’t worry, I’m still doing my weekly Church Times cartoon, adding new content to CartoonChurch.com, and in fact I have a pending announcement which might interest you (Cue intriguing chords, suspense, etc).

So anyway, I’d better pump up my tyres, get myself to the starting ramp, clip in, and get on with it. Updates will follow, and in the meantime you can see my existing cycling cartoons here: CyclingCartoons.com

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
screen-capture-21

Letter to Bishop Gregory, sent with a gift of some pencils

Dave Walker
[Address supplied]
Langdon Hills
Essex
SS16

Bishop of St. Asaph
The Rt Revd Gregory K. Cameron
Bishop’s Office
Esgobty
St. Asaph
LL17 0TW

12 February 2016

Dear Bishop Gregory,

Last week, on Facebook, you described my black-and-white drawn-as-a-line-drawing ‘We are the church’ colouring page as being ‘very monochrome racially’.

we-are-the-church-update-706

screen-capture-20

The image in question was not, I am aware, the best drawing I have ever done. It was originally drawn for another purpose altogether, and lacked several aspects of a healthy church congregation, namely children and people smiling. I regret putting the image up in an unedited form, and recognise that I need to improve these aspects of the picture.

But, by describing my drawing as ‘very monochrome racially’, I would suggest that you are, first of all, misunderstanding the nature of a colouring page. If I was to have supplied a colouring page in any non-monochrome format there would not be much to colour in, and I imagine that those wanting to use the image for its intended purpose would be rather disappointed.

But you are also effectively saying that the figures in this image are white. I don’t know how you can know this, as it is a black and white line drawing. If their skin is white, then their hair, clothes, and shoes are also all white. This would make them an unusual congregation to say the least, and one who would need to spend a significant amount of time taking care of their laundry.

If these figures have white skin, then all the figures in all my black and white cartoons and illustrations (the vast majority of my work) are white. That’s ten years of Church Times contributions, along with just about everything else I’ve done.

I put a huge amount of energy into making my cartoons diverse. I take care to depict clergy (now including bishops) as both male and female, and I try to make the total numbers of characters of either sex in my cartoons approximately equal. I have not always, I will freely admit, made enough effort to include those in wheelchairs, but I have become better at doing so. But the suggestion that I have chosen to depict all the people in all of my cartoons over more than ten years as all being white is quite hurtful, and, if I’m to be honest, made me quite angry when I read it.

pencils-706

I am enclosing a gift of some multicultural ‘People of the World’ skin-tone pencils. Please print this image off and colour it in. I hope that this will demonstrate that the racial and ethnic composition of this picture is entirely down to the person colouring it, and that seeing a black and white line drawing as only consisting of white people says more about the person viewing it than the artist.

Yours faithfully,

Dave Walker

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
shopping cartoon

CartoonChurch licence price rise

shopping cartoon

The aim of this post: to write about my prices going up, without sounding either overly apologetic or salesperson-like.

There’s no easy way to decide how much to charge for something. Whatever you choose, some people will tell you that it is way too much for them, and others that you’re giving what you have or do away. I’ve had both reactions numerous times to my CartoonChurch licence prices.

A CartoonChurch annual unlimited-cartoons church licence has been £35 since 2005, when I launched the site. There was also a lower option for those who wanted more limited use, but I decided that having several rates was too complex (and I needed to make a living). It seems absurd not to have put the cost of a licence up for 11 years, but I’ve always wanted the price to be one that a church could afford without calling an extraordinary meeting, laying off the cleaner, cancelling the extension project, etc. But, having gone back to full-time cartooning, and having made significant improvements to the site, now seems like a good time.

So, from March onwards a year’s church licence will cost £42. This is still quite a lot below the 2005 price when inflation is taken into account (inflation calculator). I hope that this is still good value. For a small fraction of my commercial rates you get a good selection of my best work to use in any way you want, now including colouring pages, which you can print off any many times as you like (a lot more of those to come by the way). The single-use licence will be going up from the beginning of March too.

The good news: until 29 February you can still buy a church licence for £35 – you can find information about doing so here.

A huge thank you once again to everyone who supports what I do by buying a licence.

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
coffee-time-706

Free sample of my colouring pages

church colouring page

A new departure for my CartoonChurch.com site: Colouring pages. They are designed to be printed out and coloured in by either adults or children. Perfect for giving to the church council to calm them before that important debate on removing the pews – or for any other purpose you can think of. There are five designs at the moment, but if they prove popular I will add more. You can see them all here.

The colouring images are for use by licence holders, but here’s a free sample that you can try. This is free for personal use. Print out a couple of copies for family members, but if you use this image with a larger group than that or at your church I’d ask you to buy a licence. I hope that’s fair – thank you!

Download the free sample high resolution image

Instructions for downloading the cartoon
In Google Chrome or Firefox you can save the cartoon onto your computer by right clicking on the link, then selecting ‘ Save Link As…’, choosing where you want to store the image on your computer, then clicking ‘Save’. In Internet Explorer right click on the link and select ‘Save Target As…’.

Share this: Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone